Hospitality (HOS) Courses


HOS 100 Introduction to Tourism (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the Tourism Industry. The student will be exposed to the various components which comprise Tourism. There will be opportunities for the student to observe the Tourism Industry thorough field experiences. This course provides the basis for further study in the Hospitality Programs. Students enrolled in this course, as an elective, will have the opportunity to explore another business-related field as a career option.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 101 Principles of Hotel and Resort Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

An overview of the history, organizational structure, and economics of the hotel business and the career opportunities in the hospitality industry. The emphasis of the course will be an examination of the technical operations integral to hotel and resort management. Areas of study will include: hotel and resort operations; front office operations; food, beverage and restaurant operations; housekeeping and engineering; sales; staff management; and guest service.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 105 Orientation to Hospitality (2-0) 1 hr.

This course is designed to expose students to the many career choices available within the hospitality industry. Students in Tourism Management, Food and Beverage Management, Hotel and Resort Management and Culinary Arts will meet together once weekly to explore the many facets of the industry they will study. Students will learn career building skills as well as developing a professional network so vital to the hospitality industry. Students will gain input from guest speakers in addition to the faculty to expand exploration beyond the classroom. Development of professional skills through service learning opportunities as well as industry experience will be emphasized throughout the course.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 130 Introduction to Food and Beverage (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course examines the complexities of food and beverage management. Both hotel food service operations and freestanding restaurants will be discussed. Students will explore menu planning, pricing, sanitation and safety, kitchen layout, storage facilities and principles, food preparation techniques, purchasing and inventory, beverage control, responsible beverage distribution and food service presentation methods.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 135 Rooms Division Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course will provide detailed analysis of the policies and procedures utilized in managing the rooms division of a hotel. Predominant areas of study will include the front office and housekeeping. The student will explore guest check-in and check-out, front office operations and structure, reservations and the switchboard, the accounting process, and the night audit. The day-to-day functions of an effective housekeeping department, cleanliness standards, housekeeping procedures, inspecting, and cleaning supplies and equipment will also be discussed. Each student will focus on methods for cultivating a service-oriented attitude in rooms division employees.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 160 Bar and Beverage Management (2-0) 2 hrs.

This Class is designed to give food and beverage students knowledge in the operation of beverage based hospitality enterprises ranging from coffee houses to bars and taverns. Identifying and serving target markets purchasing and inventory controls, and risk management as well as basic of mixology are topics of study. Students will also study current market trends as well as laws concerning sales and service of alcoholic beverages. Students will also be required to attend and pass TIPS responsible beverage service certification. A passing grade for the TIPS exam will be required for the successful completion of this course.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 205 Principles of Food Production (4-0) 4 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of food preparation. Topics of study include kitchen organization and efficiency, equipment usage, recipe utilization and manipulation, food composition, preparation methods, ingredient uses and availability, product evaluation, sanitation techniques, and kitchen safety.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 210 Hospitality Computer Applications (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course will examine the relationship between computers and an industry that was founded on high touch rather than high tech. Students will work with actual hospitality software including a front office module of a Property Management System. The class will also learn to manipulate MS Publisher a design software package, and MS PowerPoint, a presentations software package. In all instances, the student will see how computers can be tools for effective management. Prerequisite: HOS 101.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 215 Sustainable Tourism Planning (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge regarding the role of management science in the design of a sustainable destination. The student will have an understanding of management science and its application to sustainable tourism destination planning and development. The planning process will be a major focus of study. The student will be exposed to management issues that relate to urban and rural tourism development. The student will have the opportunity to apply course concepts knowledge through case studies of selected destinations. The course will culminate with student teams developing a case study for a specific New York State destination.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 220 Hospitality Marketing and Sales (3-0) 3 hrs.

A comprehensive introduction to procedures and practices involved in services marketing and sales, such as: product research; development and packaging; pricing strategies; advertising and branding; marketing research and market evaluation; promotions; customer relationship management; the sales process lead to close; component parts of a sales presentation; converting features to benefits; and hospitality distribution channels. Focus is placed upon marketing cooperation with all other business functions and disciplines.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 225 Meeting Planning and Conference Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course discusses the specialized field of meeting and conference management and its impact on the hotel industry. Each student will consider the component parts of a successful meeting and analyze these parts from both a meeting planner standpoint and a hotel management team standpoint. Areas of study will include: site selection and negotiations, program development, banquet food service, function room set-up, conference support services and meeting evaluation.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 227 Destination Marketing (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the variety of organizations and strategies utilized to market a destination. The student will study marketing management as it relates to a destination. The student will be exposed to the structures of destination marketing organizations, funding sources, and operations. There will be opportunities for the student to apply marketing management theory, utilizing authentic destination/marketing organizational models. This course provides an understanding of the various careers in destination marketing organizations.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 230 Hospitality Law (3-0) 3 hrs.

Hospitality law is designed to introduce the student to the legal issues surrounding the practices of the hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: contract law, negligence, bailment, rights of innkeepers, rights of guests, legal responsibilities connected with travel and tourism, liability with respect to the sale of food and alcohol, regulation and licensing, employment issues, and safety and security issues affecting the hospitality industry.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 232 Event Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles of event management. A conceptual framework will be developed through definitions, models, and the utilization of case studies. The student will learn how to formulate event tourism strategies for destinations. The planning, development, management, and implementation of festivals, entertainment events, corporate events, cultural events, and sports events will be the focus of study. Specific topics will include event studies, bid preparation, public and corporate sponsorship, negotiations, and volunteer staff management. Students will have the opportunity to volunteer and participate in a variety of authentic events and festivals.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 250 Hospitality and Tourism Professional Work Experience (2-0)

The Hospitality and Tourism Management Internship Program enables Finger Lakes Community College students to supplement their academic studies and increase career awareness through field work related to the hospitality industry. The students' activities during the internship will include both participation and observation so that they can develop applicable skills and an understanding of the overall organization and operation of a hospitality enterprise. (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grade.) Prerequisite: HOS 100 or HOS 101, 15 credits completed, and a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


HOS 260 Tourism Seminar (3-0) 3 hrs.

The Tourism Seminar is a culminating course designed to provide Tourism students with an opportunity to integrate theory and principles learned in other required courses. This knowledge will be applied to an authentic Tourism project or destination in New York State. The students will work as a team with an assigned mentor from the field to research, evaluate, synthesize information and create an appropriate document. This document will be submitted to the professional mentor for their input and evaluation. The document will include research findings and recommendations.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF